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Many Cyberspace Solarium Commission recommendations expected to become federal law

Articles, Blog, Congress, Cyber Security, cybersecurity, Cyberspace Solarium Commission
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Dozens of cybersecurity measures designed to protect US businesses and infrastructure are part of the National Defense Authorization Act. Budget, political concerns might eliminate some.

Several cybersecurity proposals are advancing in both the US House and Senate that flow from the prolific work of the public-private brainstorming initiative called the Cyberspace Solarium Commission. The Commission was formed in 2019 to break through the seemingly intractable barriers blocking the path to devising and implementing practical solutions to the most challenging cybersecurity problems.

The vehicle through which the commission hopes to enact several dozen of its legislative recommendations (out of 75 recommendations included in its inaugural report this past spring) is the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), an annual “must-pass” federal law that sets the budget and expenditures for the US military. The commission’s executive director Mark Montgomery estimated earlier this month that each chamber’s bills would feature eight to 20 of the commission’s recommendations.

[This article appeared in CSO Online. To read the rest of the article please visit here.]

Bipartisan bill could bring back the White House national cyber director role

Articles, Blog, Congress, Cyber Security, cybersecurity, White House
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Cyberspace Solarium Commission leaders introduce the National Cyber Director Act to reintroduce cybersecurity expertise into the White House.

Last week a bipartisan group of US House of Representatives legislators introduced the National Cyber Director Act to create the position of a national cyber director within the White House. The creation of this role is one of the chief recommendations of an increasingly influential intergovernmental group known as the Cyberspace Solarium Commission.

The commission issued its report — the product of months-long deliberations by four members from congress, four senior executive agency leaders and six experts from outside of government – just as the coronavirus pandemic quarantine kicked in during March. Nevertheless, the commission’s 80 recommendations, such as creating a national cyber director, are quickly being translated into actionable legislation on Capitol Hill.

Two of the commission’s leaders, Cyberspace Solarium Chair Congressman Jim Langevin (D-RI) and Solarium Co-Chair Congressman Mike Gallagher (R-WI), introduced the bill. Other legislators backing the bill include House Oversight and Reform Committee Chairwoman Carolyn Maloney (D-NY), Ranking Member of the Committee on Homeland Security’s Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure and Innovation John Katko (R-NY), former Ranking Member of the House Intelligence Committee C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD), and Ranking Member of the House Intelligence Committee’s Subcommittee on Intelligence Modernization and Readiness Will Hurd (R-TX).

[This article appeared in CSO Online. To read the rest of the article please visit here.]

New Republican bill latest in long line to force encryption backdoors

Articles, Blog, Congress, Cyber Security, cybersecurity, Encryption
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Here we go again. Senate Republicans push a new bill to mandate “lawful access” to encrypted devices and data. It won’t end until law enforcement has better cyber forensics capabilities.

In what seems like Groundhog Day when it comes to encrypted communications, a group of Republican senators last week introduced the Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act, which aims to end the use of so-called “warrant-proof” encrypted technology by terrorists and criminals. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Tom Cotton (R-AR) and Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) introduced this latest measure to find a way for law enforcement to gain access to devices and data that are protected by unbreakable encryption methods.

“The Lawful Access to Encrypted Data Act is a balanced solution that keeps in mind the constitutional rights afforded to all Americans while providing law enforcement the tools needed to protect the public from everyday violent crime and threats to our national security,” the Senators said in a statement.

Although the bill’s proponents don’t say so explicitly, the “lawful access” it seeks to establish mirrors a long string of potentially damaging efforts by the federal government to install backdoors into encrypted communications, according to critics. Virtually all cybersecurity and cryptography experts insist that any break in the encryption chain will break security and protection altogether, leaving criminals and adversarial nation-states with even more power to hack into users’ devices and communications for nefarious purposes.

[This article appeared in CSO Online. To read the rest of the article please visit here.]

Senate subcommittee blasts FCC and Team Telecom approach to Chinese supply chain threats

Articles, Blog, China, Congress, Cyber Security, cybersecurity, Cybersecurity Legislation, News
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A report claims that oversight of Chinese telecoms for security threats to the US communications supply chain is lacking and without adequate authority.

The Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations released on Tuesday a report, “Threats to US Networks: Oversight of Chinese Government-owned Carriers.” The document slams the current government review process that oversees how Chinese telecom companies operate in the United States for not rigorously monitoring Chinese tech providers. It outlines a Senate investigation that began shortly after the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in May 2019 denied a China Mobile USA application to provide international telecom services.

The subcommittee said it reviewed more than 6,400 pages of documents and conducted more than ten interviews, including interviews with representatives from the FCC, Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), China Telecom Americas, China Unicom Americas, ComNet, AT&T, Verizon and CenturyLink. The subcommittee also said it met with researchers who analyzed the Chinese government’s use of telecommunications carriers to hijack communications.

The subcommittee’s investigation found that the FCC and “Team Telecom,” a formerly informal group composed of representatives from the DOJ, DHS and Department of Defense, have failed to adequately monitor three Chinese government-owned carriers, China Telecom Americas, China Unicom Americas, and ComNet since they began operating in the United States in the early 2000s.

[This article appeared in CSO Online. To read the rest of the article please visit here.]

New cybersecurity recommendations for US government target IoT, social media

Articles, Blog, Congress, Cyber Security, cybersecurity, Cybersecurity Legislation, Cyberspace Solarium Commission, News
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The COVID-19 pandemic spurs the Cyberspace Solarium Commission policy initiative to issue a set of four security recommendations for the federal government in the wake of the crisis.

The Cyberspace Solarium Commission is a unique policy initiative created in 2019 to cut through the complexity of the vast and dense cybersecurity challenges facing the country. It is composed of lawmakers and government officials from across several agencies who, working with outside experts, are devising “a strategic approach to defending the United States in cyberspace against cyberattacks of significant consequences.” The high-profile focal point group came out this spring with an ambitious report that offered 75 recommendations to keep the country safe from digital threats.

Last week, the commission took its prerogative one step further. It came out with its first white paper, Lessons from the Pandemic, a timely document articulating the changes the COVID-19 crisis creates for cybersecurity. The pandemic “illustrates the challenges of ensuring resilience and continuity in a connected world,” co-chairs Senator Angus King (I-ME) and Representative Mike Gallagher (R-WI), wrote in their executive summary of the white paper.

The white paper contains observations about the parallel connections between cybersecurity and the pandemic. It stresses 32 of the commission’s original recommendations, which King and Gallagher said have attained “renewed importance” in light of the coronavirus crisis.

[This article appeared in CSO Online. To read the rest of the article please visit here.]